(Source: faithlefou, via thereadables)

Woah! WTF??

Hey guys!

I know its been a long time since Jaz or I wrote something on here but trust me we’ve been reading and studying. I wanted to let you guys know that I created a YouTube channel and I’ve posted a few videos on there. 

Check them out when you have time :) 

https://www.youtube.com/user/stayYAforever

Later Days, 
Mere

P.S i’m going to write down my book reviews for the books i’ve read so those will be up shortly. 

unypl:

“Julius Caesar,” by William Shakespeare
Borrow I Read

unypl:

“Julius Caesar,” by William Shakespeare

Borrow I Read

housingworksbookstore:

heidijulavits:

WARNING: PAPER IS DANGEROUS
The card catalog is a threat to truth and relevance! It is a constantly intensifying, present-tense menace. It becomes. It does this every day. 

EVERY. DAY.

housingworksbookstore:

heidijulavits:

WARNING: PAPER IS DANGEROUS

The card catalog is a threat to truth and relevance! It is a constantly intensifying, present-tense menace. It becomes. It does this every day

EVERY. DAY.

(via unypl)

"The great short stories – by Gogol, Chekov, Munro, Wolff, et al – seem to affirm that human experience is at least somewhat shared – that what matters to you probably matters to me too. That’s a pretty optimistic stance, even if a given story is, on the surface, “dark.”"

— George Saunders, On the Heart of Story: A Q&A with George Saunders, Author of Tenth of December | Everyday eBook (via housingworksbookstore)

(via housingworksbookstore)

housingworksbookstore:

Look at Michael Signorelli getting all Moby-Dick in our bookstore in the Wall Street Journal. (via Taking on Tomes Together - WSJ.com)

housingworksbookstore:

Look at Michael Signorelli getting all Moby-Dick in our bookstore in the Wall Street Journal. (via Taking on Tomes Together - WSJ.com)

scribnerbooks:

16 fancy gifts for book nerds.

What We Saw At Night: 3/5

image

Even that might be a little generous…

Long Time, no see, lovelies. I guess I’ll jump right into this one then.

What We Saw At Night is sort of a mystery. It doesn’t have any supernatural aspects to it, so it’s a bit of a rare story for me. Allie Kim, and her best friends, Rob and Juliet are three teenagers with a rare disease called xeroderma pigmentosum, or XP for short; that basically means that they are allergic to the sun. But they won’t allow their nocturnalism to hinder them from having a full life. In fact, they declare that they have it better than the “Daytimers.” The city is theirs while the world sleeps, and since Juliet’s dad works as a police officer on the night shift, they get away with a lot of things.

The trio learns Parkour, a sort of discipline and sport all wrapped into one from what I can understand. They do it to gain a sense of adventure, in a way, but also to prove to themselves and to the world that their lives as “vampires” doesn’t make them any less than a Daytimer. If you guys don’t know, Parkour is pretty tough. Allie describes it as “being one with the earth” in a bunch of places. The people who do Parkour are half crazy, but also strong, fast, focused, flexible, and quick-thinkers… Look up some videos to see some examples.

Allie is our protagonist. She’s rather likeable, and smart… That’s all I can really say about her. She tends to be sarcastic, but that usually comes out when she’s feeling stressed and especially when she wants to pick a fight to get her mind off of her worry. She’s the most timid out of the three main characters.

Juliet is that one friend who you think you are the closest to, but when you take a step back and think about it, you really don’t know a whole lot about her. She’s the more adventurous one, the girl who will talk even the most cautious person into something totally stupid, but so worth the risk. Juliet got Allie and Rob into Parkour, and definitely has the most control over everyone in their lives.

Rob is a sweetheart, but outside of that, I don’t really know much about him. He’s level-headed in chaos, and keeps both girls grounded — Allie when she’s being impossibly timid, and Juliet when she’s being impossible.

As far as the plot goes, I still don’t understand where the climax was. Maybe it was at the end. Maybe it was when Juliet gave up her secrets. All I do know is that it wasn’t clear, and that was a let-down when I finally finished the book with a, what the hell? look on my face. I would have thrown the book if it weren’t my Kindle (oh, don’t act like you’ve never thrown a book when it got you upset. Have you not read Breaking Dawn? Or House of Night? Or any manga for that matter?) I feel like there could have been a lot more going on, or rather, it could have moved at a faster pace and been a bit longer.

Overall, I only liked this book. It was an interesting, character-driven plot…. but it didn’t keep my attention like I want a book to. I mean… it took me six weeks to read it because I just was not interested until halfway through the book. And even then, I wasn’t hooked, and the ending was very unsatisfying.

By the way, there will be a sequel, What We Lost in the Dark. I’m still debating if it will be worth it.

(Source: spitcastle, via foreverandokay)

Jazzi’s Book Haul: January/February

Basically, these are just the books I didn’t review for December:

What We Saw At Night, by Jacqueline Mitchard

The Girl in the Wall, by Daphne Benedis-Grab

Pantomime, by Laura Lam

Secrets, by Liz Schultz